Audiobook Review: The Bedwetter

Rating: 3 out of 5

As it was pointed out to me recently, I’m suffering from a so-called “First World Problem:” I’m running out of female comedians with audiobooks to listen to! After Tina Fey, Mindy Kaling, and Chelsea Handler, I gave Sarah Silverman a shot with her 2010 memoir The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee.

I knew that Silverman was a vulgar comic from watching her roasts and viral videos like “I’m F***ing Matt Damon,” but I knew nothing about her personal journey.

So it was interesting to learn that she suffered from chronic depression, anxiety, and bedwetting until she was 16 years old. Because of her mental illnesses, she has even chosen to not pass down her genes and reproduce.

The book definitely gave me a newfound respect for Silverman. I empathized with her stories of childhood bullying, and shared in her success in capitalizing on feeling like an outsider. Let’s just say I hope that there are loads of people kicking themselves for mistreating this dark-haired Jewish girl turned celebrity!

Silverman has a knack for turning dark moments into comedic gold. She manages to make tough subjects like race and religion hilarious, as you can see in these gems:

“Some people need Hell. If you’re the type of guy who sees a hooker in an alleyway and instinctively thinks, “Hey, now there’s something I could rape and kill without any consequences,” then the concept of Hell might really keep you out of trouble.”

“I’m sympathetic to the nuns’ violent impulses. I mean, if I’d given up sex to devote myself to a man who I had to just trust loved me, despite never being physically around to prove it, I’d probably be smacking little children too.” 

 

Is The Bedwetter on the same level as Bossypants? Not by a long shot, but it is funny. The main downside I had with the book was its structure. The first half was fine, with linear chapters chronicling life from before she was born to her dropping out after one year in college to focus on stand-up.

However, after her ‘mid-word,’ it’s apparent that editing got a bit lax. The chapters jumped around from her various PR scandals over her many controversial jokes to her thoughts on her Jewish identity. She wrapped it up well in the afterword (written tongue-in-cheek from the perspective of God after Silverman’s future death), but I just wish that the second half had a better flow.

And like Chelsea Handler, Sarah Silverman is an acquired taste. Not everyone will enjoy her profanity and crudeness, but I hope that people can recognize the importance of free speech in comedy. You may not like her graphic descriptions of female sexuality, but I’m glad that she fights for equal opportunity vulgarity. Female comedians are constantly criticized for not acting ‘ladylike,’ and I applaud Silverman for refusing to silence her voice and follow traditional gender roles.

So while I would recommend The Bedwetter and was happy that Silverman narrated the audiobook, perhaps the narrative might make better sense in print. As for my next audio pick, I’m leaning toward I Know I Am, But What Are You? by Samantha Bee from the “The Daily Show.”

If you’ve got other audiobook suggestions, let me know!

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Audiobook Review: The Bedwetter

  1. Pingback: Audiobook Review: I Know I Am, But What Are You? | Book Club Babe

  2. Pingback: Audiobook Review: Yes Please | Book Club Babe

  3. Pingback: My 2014 Reading Recap! | Book Club Babe

  4. Pingback: Audiobook Review: The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo | Book Club Babe

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s