Movie Review: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Pt. 2

Image via ComingSoon.net

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Well…where do I start? Ever since I finished reading The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins, I can’t say that I’ve been looking forward to seeing Mockingjay on screen. My initial enthusiasm for this bandwagon has unfortunately faded into begrudging acceptance of the end.

My disappointment has nothing to do with the film’s production. I’ve enjoyed “The Hunger Games” cast, especially Woody Harrelson as Haymitch and Elizabeth Banks as Effie, both of whom did not have near enough screen time in this finale. Instead, all the attention is turned towards Katniss and her crew’s mission to assassinate President Snow.

Collins’ magic was in the arenas, and without them, all that’s left is a sub-par dystopian tale in which no one really learns their lesson. I wrote a major rant about this book, so naturally I went into the theater with low expectations.

On the plus side, the film was very well done, and I enjoyed the trek to the Capitol as the rebels dodged all the various booby traps. One of the aspects that frustrated me about the novel is that Katniss’ point-of-view is very limited. However, once you’re out of her head, you can be more engaged with the other characters and the action-packed plot in front of them.

Despite the thrills and suspense, I felt pretty meh about this movie. Not surprising to the fans of the books, the ending of this film was depressing as hell. Beloved characters were lost, gone in the blink of an eye. Although the bad guys get their just desserts, you don’t walk away feeling accomplished. And just like in the novel, the story’s epilogue seemed artificial and forced.

I’m glad to put this series behind me, and I can only hope that Hollywood has had its fill of dystopias, at least for a while. Of course, this is doubtful, given the vast fortune that’s at stake. Lionsgate entertainment vice chairman Michael Burns revealed that he’s interested in making Hunger Games prequels featuring previous years in the arena. As much as I’d like to see a young Haymitch become a victor, I agree with Forbes:

If Lionsgate is indeed determined to give the fans what they want, what they risk doing is basically turning the franchise into an annual (or bi-annual) fictionalized version of the Hunger Games for multiplex consumption. They will have turned the franchise into a fictionalized “to the death” version of American Gladiators, which would basically complete the transformation from “explicit critique of bread-and-circuses” to “prime example of bread-and-circuses.”

As a fan who went from excitement to disillusionment, I just want to put this story to bed and move on with my life. Instead, I’ll have to submit to watching this cash cow get turned into one of Collins’ mutts: a zombie-like, demented version of itself.

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4 thoughts on “Movie Review: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Pt. 2

  1. I’m in the same boat. I didn’t think the book Mockingjay was particularly good, and got pretty much what I expected from the movie version. As you said so well, the concept of the Hunger Games and the arenas were really unique to this series — but when we’re dealing with the rebellion, it could be anyone of a dozen dystopian worlds that are so popular now.

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