Literary News: In Case You (Really) Missed It

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The past 14 hours have been a whirlwind of fun: last night my book club met to drink a few bottles of wine while discussing the horrendous novel All the Birds in the Sky (review coming next week!). This morning was even invigorating, because I was finally able to login to Pokemon Go, the mobile game that’s taken over the globe. I’ve been gallivanting around San Francisco hoping to catch them all!

But now it’s time to get serious…I have a confession to make.

In full disclosure, I have a terrible habit of filing away articles for my blog, then forgetting that they exist. Every time my cursor hovers over the bookmarks folder on my browser, I cringe and try to ignore the growing list as best I can.

But 2016 is half over, and I just can’t take it anymore! Time for some summer cleaning!

Here are the first six months of literary news in review, in case you really, really missed the boat, or just want to relive the excitement!

Literary Feminism

  • “Damn, you’re not reading any books by white men this year? That’s so freakin brave and cool” (Jezebel)
  • “In literature and in life, men and women still want different things in a mate” (Jezebel)
  • “One weird trick that makes a novel addictive” (Jezebel)

Harry Potter News

  • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child to be eighth book” (BBC)
  • “J.K. Rowling’s History of Magic in North America was a travesty from start to finish” (io9)

Hollywood Adaptations

  • “Ava DuVernay confirmed to direct A Wrinkle in Time” (IndieWire)
  • “Inside the peculiar new home of Tim Burton’s Miss Peregrine” (Entertainment Weekly)
  • “6 adaptations that fixed the book (according to the author)” (Cracked)
  • “First Look as Neil Patrick Harris as Count Olaf on A Series of Unfortunate Events set” (Spinoff Online)
  • Will drama about young William Shakespeare picked up to series by TNT” (Deadline)

Et Cetera

  • Placing Literature maps out real places you’ve read about in books” (Lifehacker)
  • “The mass-market edition of To Kill a Mockingbird is dead” (New Republic)

Can you tell I’m a fan of Gawker Media publications? After reading this list, what literary news made you most excited? And if I missed any headlines, please send them my way!

Merry Christmas to Me: Nicholas Sparks is Sued and Other Literary News

Happy holidays everyone! ‘Tis the season to sit around a fire, drink hot cocoa, spend time with your loved ones…and relish the fact that the author you hate the most is in a bit of legal trouble. Hey, what can I say? I’m on Santa’s naughty list!

But before I jump into this major headline, let me quickly recap the latest literary news of this month:

  1. 2016 marks the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, and the literary world is going wild! Adaptations of the Bard’s plays will soon be flooding a city near you. I have yet to watch this year’s “Macbeth” retelling with Michael Fassbender, and I’ve been told that I really need to see Joss Whedon’s “Much Ado About Nothing,” both of which sound like excellent ways to celebrate #Shakespeare400!
  2. I’ve been procrastinating big time when it comes to finishing Tolkien’s translation of Beowulf, but perhaps this upcoming TV series will inspire me! This 13 episode drama will premiere on Esquire on Saturday, January 23, at 10 p.m. ET.
  3. Want to boost your speed-reading skills? Lifehacker has a how-to guide on reading an entire book in one day. My personal best was 12 hours for each of the last few Harry Potter novels!
  4. The Internet Engineering Steering Group recently approved Error 451, a status code to inform web visitors that the content they can’t see is due to censorship. This online addition is appropriately named after–you guessed it–Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.

Image via Queerty

Now moving on to the big news! My blog followers obviously know how much I loathe Nicholas Sparks; in fact, last month one reader informed me that the author is now caught in a legal feud for being–let’s face it–an utter ass.

In 2006, Sparks poured $10 million of his own money to found the Epiphany School, a Christian prep school in New Bern, North Carolina. This devout Catholic who refuses to write about homosexual love is now being sued by Saul Hillel Benjamin, the former headmaster of his own school, for discrimination.

Sources report that Benjamin is accusing Sparks of threatening him and creating a hostile environment after he attempted to establish a non-discrimination policy and a gay-straight alliance organization at Epiphany. Other claims against Sparks include barring African-Americans and promoting anti-Semitism. When Benjamin resigned after he was allegedly held hostage in a conference room to explain his beliefs, he called the school “a veritable cauldron of bigotry.”

Sparks’ defense? Taking a plot from his own books, he claims that Benjamin has Alzheimer’s and is making everything up. I for one completely believe that Sparks is a raging bigot and am not surprised to hear that he uses religious fundamentalism to spread his hateful views.

Granted, the lawsuit was filed in October of last year, so this news isn’t exactly new, but I’m sure that I’m not the only one to receive the story belatedly. Everyone has a mission in life: mine is making sure that the entire world knows that Sparks is a total scumbag, but fortunately he seems to be doing a fine job of that on his own.

Literary News I Missed Last Month

As most of you are already aware, I spent November participating in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). For the past three years, I put blogging on hold during this time, only to feel overwhelmed about getting back on track each December.

Right now, I’m reading the finale to the Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children trilogy, Library of Souls by Ransom Riggs, as well as Beautiful You by Chuck Palahniuk for my real-life book club. I’ve also had the chance to complete God’s Debris by Scott Adams and watched “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Pt. 2” in theaters, so stay tuned for all my reviews, which I’ll be posting soon!

This post, however, is going to cover the tidbits of literary news that I bookmarked last month. Some of these you’ve probably already come across yourself, but if you’re like me, life can get so hectic that you simply can’t keep up with all the headlines. So let’s catch up together!

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Image via BuzzFeed

Judging Books by Their Covers

Want some artistic inspiration? Check out the Book Cover Archive, which categorizes a plethora of books by their cover designs. Seeing them all side by side makes you appreciate the creativity that goes into them!

This BuzzFeed quiz is titled, “The Hardest Book Cover Quiz You’ll Ever Take,” but I still scored 17 out of 22! Not too shabby! Try it out for yourself!

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Image via Jezebel

White-Washing Woes

One of my favorite manga, Death Note, written by Tsugumi Ohba and illustrated by Takeshi Obata, is coming to the big screen, but I can’t say that I’m looking forward to it. Hollywood continues to perpetuate its lack of racial diversity by pathetically white-washing Death Note’s Japanese characters. Much to many fans’ disappointment, Light and Misa will be played by Nat Wolff and Margaret Qualley respectively, although I imagine that their names will be changed to something as bland as these actors.

The white-washing continued in the blockbuster of the season, The Martian, adapted from the novel by Ridley Scott. In another slight to the Asian acting community, a white actress was cast as Korean scientist Mindy Park, and a black actor took the place of an Indian NASA director. Seriously, Hollywood, STOP with this nonsense!

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Image via ComingSoon.net

Fantasy Adaptations

The Merlin Saga by T.A. Barron finally has a screenwriter: none other than Philippa Boyens, who worked with Peter Jackson on the LOTR trilogy! As a child, I read most of this series when the books were published, beginning with The Lost Years of Merlin in 1996 and ending with The Great Tree of Avalon in 2004. Disney better do this movie right!

Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials gets another chance to prove its genius, this time in a drama series on BBC One. After watching the outrageously bad American movie version, which I’ve attempted scrubbing from my memory, I’m ecstatic to hear that the U.K. plans give this story the long-form development on TV that it deserves.

Lastly, Margaret Atwood, the literary celebrity whom I had the opportunity of a lifetime to meet, recently announced that she’s writing her first graphic novel series, Angel Catbird. With a superhero that’s part-cat and part-owl, the story sounds utterly ridiculous, but knowing Atwood, there’s much more to it than fur and feathers.

That’s all for now! Let me know what you think about these news stories, and feel free to send me more that I might have missed!

The Latest in Literary News!

It’s a bit of an understatement to say that I’ve been busy lately. Without going into too much detail, I’ll just say that I’m going through a stressful transition, so apologies for missing blog opportunities like Top Ten Tuesday!

I’m currently reading Sisterhood Everlasting, the 2011 sequel to the Sisterhood of Traveling Pants series by Ann Brashares. In the meantime before I post my review, I thought that I would pop in to share some tidbits of literary news that I’ve come across:

Image via Amazon

1.    Mindy Kaling’s second memoir Why Not Me? will be published on September 29, and is currently available for pre-order. I loved listening to the audiobook of Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? so I’m sure that I’ll scoop this book up as well. It’s unfortunate that her show, “The Mindy Project,” was recently canceled, because I believe that Kaling is an under-appreciated comedic voice. She seems like such a sweet person, and I wish her success with her upcoming book!

Image via Rotten Tomatoes

2.     Thomas Vinterberg’s adaptation of “Far From the Madding Crowd” was released in limited theaters on May 1. Although I was not a fan of Thomas Hardy’s poetry or writing of Tess of the d’Urbervilles, this looks like a beautiful film. I can’t resist period dramas, especially those that star the exquisite Carey Mulligan. It has a Rotten Tomatoes rating of 83%, so perhaps I should give Hardy another shot before seeing this adaptation!

Image via Monkeys Fighting Robots

3.     Aldous Huxley’s dystopian classic Brave New World is coming to the small screen with a TV series on Syfy. The network is collaborating with Steven Spielberg’s production company Amblin Television. No word yet on its release, but the bar will be set awfully high for one of my favorite books of all time.

Are you as excited as I am about these three new and upcoming releases? Share your thoughts in the comments!

Beowulf and the next Tim Burton movie: The latest in literary adaptations

It’s the first day of spring! Despite the crippling drought in California, I admit that I’m enjoying the abnormally warm weather here in the Bay Area. This week I’ve been binge-watching “House of Cards” on Netflix (I’m only on season 2, so no spoilers!), which many people may not know is based on a novel by British politician Michael Dobbs. This remake has got me thinking about other stories that are coming to television and movie theaters!

ComingSoon.net reported two fun facts on March 12, so here’s what I’m excited about when it comes to literary adaptations:

Image via ComingSoon.net

1. ITV, a television network in the United Kingdom, will be re-imagining Beowulf in a 13-part drama series, the filming of which will begin at the end of this month. Kieran Bew (from “Da Vinci’s Demons” and other British TV series) will star as Beowulf with William Hurt as Hrothgar and Joanne Whalley as Rheda. I’m currently reading this epic, so it will be interesting to see it on TV–hopefully following the stylistic footsteps of “Game of Thrones”!

Image via ComingSoon.net

2. Another production underway is the anticipated Tim Burton adaptation of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, which is scheduled for March 4, 2016. The movie will have a star-studded cast, including Asa Butterfield (“Ender’s Game”) as Jacob, Eva Green (“Casino Royale,” “300: Rise of an Empire”) as Miss Peregrine, and Allison Janney (“Mom,” “Masters of Sex”) as a female version of Dr. Golan, who was originally male in the novel. This is a fantastic literary bandwagon to join, and I’m optimistic that Burton will preserve its creepy-cool vibe.

For even more to look forward to, check out my most anticipated movie adaptations of 2015! And let me know what film and TV remakes you’re psyched about in the comments!

My New TV Obsession: Outlander!

Image via Outlander TV News

You know that feeling when you discover a really good TV show? You binge watch until you catch up, then anxiously await the latest episode. You want to bring it up in random conversation and convince everyone around you to get on the bandwagon. You’re hooked, no ifs, ands, or buts about it.

Well, that feeling has happened to me with the new hit “Outlander!” On Saturdays at 9:00pm EST on STARZ, the show is based off the series by Diana Gabaldon, which began in 1991 and currently stands at eight novels.

The story follows Claire Randall (played by Caitriona Balfe), an English nurse who is vacationing in Scotland with her husband Frank after World War II. After seeing each other only briefly in the past five years, this ‘honeymoon’ is a chance for them to reconnect.

They come across an ancient Druid ritual, and when Claire returns to the scene the following day, she touches one of the standing stones and is magically transported back 200 years in time.

Image via Buzz Sugar

Lost and confused by what has happened, she runs into Frank’s ancestor, a ruthless British officer known as Black Jack Randall. She nearly escapes being raped when a group of Scottish highlanders rescue her and take her back to Castle Leoch.

Even though her nursing skills have helped the clan, she has yet to earn their trust. Fearing she’s an English spy, they keep her against her will, while she plans her return to the standing stones and into the present time.

Although I am not familiar with the book series, I am absolutely in love with this show. I’m already a huge fan of period dramas, and if you like “The Tudors,” “Rome,” or “Game of Thrones,” you will appreciate “Outlander.” It’s the perfect combination of history, adventure, science fiction, and folklore.

And did I mention romance? Claire’s relationship with Scotsman Jamie MacTavish is sizzling under the surface, and I look forward to watching their love progress. I also look forward to shirtless shots of actor Sam Heughan in his kilt, but who can blame a girl?

I’ll just leave this here 😉 (Image via Cinema Blend)

I’ve only seen the first three episodes, but I can’t give the show enough praise. Claire is a strong female heroine with plenty of wit and wisdom, and the landscape of Scotland is so gorgeous it counts as its own character. STARZ has signed off on 16 highly addictive episodes this season, so jump right in!

Book News!

It’s been an eventful week, not only for me, since I was a bridesmaid in one of my closest friends’ wedding last weekend, but also for book news! Here’s the recap:

Today would’ve been T.S. Eliot’s 124th birthday! My favorite Eliot moment was when we were reading “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” at UC Santa Cruz, and some hippie chick thought the protagonist was strong and brave, despite the entire class politely explaining that he was a weak, pathetic character. She couldn’t deal with the fact that there are wrong answers in poetry, and stormed out of class crying. Interpretation is key to literary scholars, but I think we know that T.S. Eliot was not a rainbows-and-puppies kind of writer.

Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of The Great Gatsby gets a North American release date of May 10, 2013. Coming Soon commented that this may not be a good choice, since the second week of May has opened quite a few duds. You mean, you couldn’t tell by the modern soundtrack?

Similar to Miley Cyrus flipping Disney the bird with her scandalous antics, J.K. Rowling is proving she can’t be tamed with her first post-Potter novel, Casual Vacancy. The New Yorker published an extensive profile on the author, who discusses the book’s adult themes and her unwillingness to write for critics. Reviews might be negative, but with the money she’s made with Potter, I say that she can write whatever she damn well pleases.

Speaking of flipping the bird, in a complete act of disrespect, Billy Connolly, who’s playing dwarf Dain Ironfoot in “The Hobbit,” called Tolkien “unreadable” and insulted devoted fans of the author. It’s a shame Peter Jackson can’t donate your salary to charity, because with that kind of attitude, you don’t deserve such an amazing career opportunity anyway.

The world of TV is working on its latest facepalm, this time a modern drama based on Wuthering Heights. Tentatively titled “Napa,” the story has swapped Victorian England for California wine country. I love a good soap opera, but leave Bronte out of it, will you, screenwriters? That’s a tale that needs no improving!

Lastly, my blog has been gaining traffic due to the release of “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.” Unfortunately, it’s only in limited theaters (none of which are close to me), so it looks like I’ll be catching it when it comes out on DVD. But feel free to re-read my book review here!

So there you have it! What other book news has sparked your interest?