Top Ten Books With Characters Who Commit Infidelity

Meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish

Today’s Top Ten Tuesday, a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and The Bookish, is pretty much a free-for-all, since the topic is “Top ten books which features characters who…” and it’s up to us bloggers to finish the sentence.

Why did I pick the oh-so-controversial subject of adultery? Because my first thought turned to English class during my junior year of high school, the theme of which I had dubbed, “Women who cheat on their husbands.” Not all the required reading fit into this category, but a whole lot of it did.

Call me a harlot if you want, but there’s something so captivating about women trapped in loveless marriages and seeking passion outside of them. Many of these novels were written during historical periods in which it was taboo for women of a certain age to be unwed, and I don’t blame these characters for rebelling against the prison that society coerced them in. No one gave the husbands any grief for cheating, so I say down with the double standard!

Thus, here are my top ten books with characters (both men and women!) who commit infidelity:

TTT Cheaters 1

TTT Cheaters 2

Women Who Have Wandered

1. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
2. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
3. The Awakening by Kate Chopin
4. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
5. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Men with Mistresses

6. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain
7. The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton
8. Medea by Euripides

Classic Cheaters I Need to Read

9. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
10. Lady Chatterley’s Lover by D.H. Lawrence

Top Ten Favorite Literary Heroines

Image via The Broke and the Bookish

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday, a meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, is about–as Beyoncé puts it–who run the world. That’s right: GIRLS! Here are my top ten favorite literary heroines: from the fierce young ladies of our beloved YA series to the villains you always secretly admired, there are so many women in books who kick ass and take names.

They’ve battled everything and then some, including:

  • Crappy husbands
  • Dementors
  • Armored polar bears
  • Judgmental societies
  • Crazy ex-wives in attics
  • And, of course, the patriarchy

So check out my list below, and let me know who your favorite literary heroines are in the comments!

Young-Adult Do-Gooders

1. Hermione Granger from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series

2. Lyra Belacqua from Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials series

3. Violet Baudelaire from Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events

Classic-Lit Women Up Against the Odds

4. Jane Eyre from Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre

5. Hester Prynne from Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter

6. Edna Pontellier from Kate Chopin’s The Awakening

7. Offred from Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale

8. Penelope from Margaret Atwood’s The Penelopiad

Anti-Heroines You Love to Hate

9. Lady Macbeth from William Shakespeare’s Macbeth

10. Medea from Euripides’ Medea

Masterpiece Monday: Book Versus Movie (Venn Diagram Edition)

So I found this Venn diagram the other day on TheFrisky.com, and since we were discussing classic novels and their respective film adaptations yesterday, I figured you all would have plenty to say about this.

As for me, I completely agree that The Great Gatsby, The Scarlet Letter, and One Day are better as books. However, I think that Never Let Me Go is outstanding either way, and I’d avoid Beloved in any form.

I’d be hard-pressed to find somebody who hated The Godfather, Fight Club, and The Princess Bride as movies, but I’d add that Fight Club is just as kick-ass on paper. And obviously, Harry Potter and To Kill a Mockingbird deserve to overlap both categories.

Lastly, after reading interviews of the egotistical, pompous jerk that is Nicholas Sparks, I refuse to give him any money whatsoever. I only wish I knew about his arrogance before I watched The Notebook, because I admit that it was a great movie, for being a sappy sob-fest, that is.

I haven’t read or watched most of the others, so please enlighten me with your opinions. Did this diagram get it right? What would you add? Let’s keep the debate going!